Statement of Intention & Schedule

Schedule

printed copies will be available day-of

Coffee (bring a mug) and Registration in Rooms 296/298
 
 
 
 
Rooms 296/298
 
Opening Ceremony with Spirit Learning Drum and Rod McAfee, co-founder of the Earth and Spirit Council followed by presentations by Alexander Baretich, creator of the doug flag, and Brandon Letsinger of Cascadia Now! Please arrive on time if possible and bring your own mug.
Room 236 Emergency Preparedness, Community Resilience, and the Cascadia Resilience Network featuring: Jeremy O’Leary of PREP PDX, Charla Chamberlain, long-time City Repair organizer, and Leif Brecke, founder of the Cascadia Resilience Network
 
Jeremy O’Leary will be speaking from his experience working with federal, state, and local programs that are meant to help communities prepare for disasters. As a permaculturalist, his methods for disaster preparedness integrate general community resilience and not solely emergency preparedness, or what he calls, “the long emergency”. Charla Chamberlain will speak to her experience having been a community organizer with City Repair in Portland for over a decade. She will discuss the successes and challenges she found in getting neighbors to work together towards common goals. Leif will be discussing how the formation of a Cascadia Resilience Network is taking place and the direction he envisions it going.
more info…
Rooms 296/298 A History of Bioregionalism by Judy Goldhaft
 
Curious about bioregionalism? Judy Goldhaft, director of the the Planet Drum Foundation, will be presenting a history of bioregionalism and its effect on the world. Questions examined include:
  • What is bioregionalism?
  • Where did the idea come from and what are the ramifications?
  • What groups were the original movers and shakers of bioregionalism?
  • What kinds of events, publications and community organizing has already occurred or is occurring?
  • What do coalitions look like with groups that don’t use the term but share similar values?
  • What are examples of bioregionalism in action today?
Followed by a Q&A and Discussion
more info…
Room 238 ***PANEL IS POSTPONED DUE TO ILLNESS***
 
Separating from White Separatists: Keeping the Cascadia Movement Free of White Nationalism and Racism
by Rose City Antifa
 
RCA will be presenting on the history of structural and insurgent racism in the Pacific Northwest and how that impacts organizing with a Cascadian, bioregionalist politic. We will unpack the hard right’s ideology and highlight “dog whistle” terminology that Cascadian organizers should be on the look out for. We will give organizers a background on the deep and pervasive racism in this area, so that they are more aware of how their messaging is received by communities of color and so they can act more consciously in a climate of overwhelming whiteness. To this end we would like to give organizers some information and concrete tools to more actively and effectively challenge white supremacy in their work.
more info…
LUNCH! Provided by the Cascadia Branch of Portland State University. Vegetarian and vegan options are available.
 
We will be circling up in room 296/298 to do Watershed Reportbacks. Please come prepared with a short, 2-3 minute summary of what’s happening in your watershed. If there are many people from the same watershed, we will ask you to group together. We’ll also be announcing the winners of our RSVP GAME OF CHANCE! (apparently the Oregon School System has a problem with the word “raffle”)
 
***Depending on gluten or other sensitivities, please be prepared with your own lunch option.***
Room 236 Functional Wildness: Sociocracy as an Approach to Bioregional Governance featuring Melanie Rios and Marc Tobin
 
Sociocracy, also known as Dynamic Governance, is a method of organizational design and decision making that is both inclusive and efficient. It could be applied to bioregional governance in a way that is far more participatory and inclusive at the grassroots level than the way that representative democracy is currently practiced in our society. At the same time, it has many advantages over the way that consensus process is typically used. Typical forms of consensus are hard to scale in large groups, as they often rely on whole group meetings. Sociocracy uses interlinked small groups, that can act efficiently, while sharing key information and power with other groups that they affect.
more info…
Room 238 Climate Chaos and Cascadia: Place-Based Resistance to Global Catastrophe featuring Scott Schroder + friends
 
Anthropogenic climate change and the resulting mass extinction, drought, fire, flooding, and skewed weather patterns threaten the Cascadian bioregion, and any of our plans for restoration and reinhabitation, more profoundly than any other single industrial act of eco-assualt.This panel breaks from abstract discussion of atmospheric greenhouse gases, and roots the issue in palpable and living things: wolverines, salmon, forests and in rapidly approaching catastrophic effects on the bioregion we call home. We will discuss the effects climate change has already had on the region–increased temperature, rising seas, more precipitation, diminished snowpack–and the landscapes and species that are threatened with extinction or severe alteration by the fossil fuel economy. We will discuss strategies and possibilities for human adaptedness and survival in the face of fundamental ecological changes. more info…
Room 338/BALLROOM Appropriate Appropriation and Ancestral Technology featuring Peter Bauer and Eric Bernardo
 
There is growing interest in using ancestral technology as a mechanism for living more sustainably, connecting with ancestral heritage, and providing for yourself with things from nature, or the simple enjoyment of crafting with your hands. While all humans have used various forms of these technologies, there is often friction between Native Americans and non-natives in the United States. This friction stems from the misappropriation of these technologies by non-natives, the privileged position non-native people have of being able to do these things at all (i.e. financial access to schools and gatherings), and a general lack of knowledge of traditional “prehistoric” European traditions among both Native Americans and non-natives. There will never be one right way to practice ancestral technology in a way that appeases everyone’s sensibilities. However, we must spark this discussion on a larger scale to increase the number of people working together and to reach a deeper understanding between different cultures in order to have mutual respect. This panel discussion is a step in that direction. more info…
Room 236 Indigenous Sovereignty, Rights of Nature and Local Governance featuring Aurolyn Stwyer, Treothe Bullock, Paul Cienfuegos and Lucy Marie
 
This panel seeks to explore the positive and problematic intersections between Indigenous Sovereignty strategies and rights-based organizing in Cascadia, with the purpose of elaborating an appropriate practice of decolonization within a settler colonial context. Can complementary strategies be developed between these two movements, which both seek to contravene the State-centric sovereignty of “law-from-above” with grassroots assertions of “law-from-below?” What potential risks of re-colonization may exist in Community Rights strategies within a settler colonial context, and how can these risks be recognized, transformed, and deliberately rooted within and through Indigenous vision and struggle? This dialogue will bring together voices from the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the People’s Water Trust, Friends of Celilo Falls, and Community Rights PDX. more info…
Room 238 Biocentric Resistance as Catalyst for Bioregional Resistance a workshop led by Karen Coulter
 
As the global climate crisis and the spreading radiation from the Fukishima nuclear reactor melt-down demonstrate, the destruction that humans cause to the environment now transcends national boundaries and cannot be repaired with technological solutions or societal value systems that continue to prioritize human desires above ecological limits. For bioregionalism to work in creating a viable future, it is necessary to have a biocentric value system, in which the well-being and flourishing of non-human life has value in itself, independent of the usefulness of the non-human world for human purposes. The richness and diversity of life forms are valuable in themselves. This workshop on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology explains these concepts, explores what changes would need to be made, and examines activist struggles and movements within Cascadia that have pursued these goals. more info…
Room 338/Ballroom Calling Ourselves Home: Feeling the Path of Right Relationship a workshop by rain crowe
 
To those of us of Indo-European descent, living here on unceded indigenous lands, I offer this inquiry and framing, that we might together find a courage to face, what we must, for the sake of the imperiled web of life.
 
-What is “whiteness” and how do we accountably reckon with the privileges of settler colonialism as we endeavor to cultivate a sacred relationship to lands that are not our biological and cultural forebears’?
 
-How do we recognize the patterns of conquest, slavery, entitlement, and estrangement in our lives and work to intervene in replicating them?
 
-What are the relationships between grief, shame, vulnerability, and action, in the context of decolonizing ourselves?
 
-How do we continue to simultaneously compost the culture of Empire and regenerate non-appropriated Earth cultures?
 
-What are some approaches to collectively healing inter-generational trauma and cross-cultural trauma? more info…
in the Ballroom (room 338)
 
Sara Tone performs her ode to this land, “Cascadia Earth”
 
Water Web is a twenty minute performance by Judy Goldhaft with words and movement that celebrates water and describes our complex relationship to it. Gary Snyder describes it as “… a unique dance which delights and instructs, and takes down the arbitrary boundary between art and information. ‘Information’ can be understood as a kind of energy-flow. Water in its flowing and force is constantly building and reshaping the biosphere – creative, relentless, and beautiful. Judy Goldhaft enacts these processes before our eyes.”
 
Followed by next steps and closing comments.

 
 

CASCADIA RISING: A BIOREGIONAL CONFLUENCE

We are rooting in place.

9:30 AM – 5:30PM 4/20/14 @ Portland State University

CASCADIA is a bioregion of connected watersheds and water cycles flowing from the continental divide through temperate rainforest on the northeast edge of the Pacific rim. As humans, we share it with diverse ecosystems of other animals, plants, insects, fungi, bacteria, and all forms of life. Bioregions provide a container for what we mean by truly living sustainably on this planet, putting us in acknowledged relationship to life and life sustaining systems. Bioregionalism is a hands-on philosophy that has emerged over the past five decades to describe our work of restoration, resistance, and reinhabitation, and it can be applied everywhere with approaches tailored to each unique region. Indeed, any people that exists in a place for an extended period of time without relying on industrial resource importation from distant lands will necessarily develop bioregional awareness. The ideas behind bioregionalism are certainly not new to Indigenous communities around the world. Non-Indigenous people who are embarking on this work are asking themselves the question “what does place-based allyship look like?”

Cascadia, in word and vision, evokes passion for ecology, cultures of place, restorative economies, and self governance. These heartfelt and sometimes nebulous desires mean many things to many people and create our framework for this gathering. Many people are already working on various tangible aspects of restoration, resistance, and reinhabitation.. We invite those voices to step up and share their passions. We invite members of marginalized communities to participate, to share their voices and experiences in order that they may guide more conscious and inclusive action. We strive to make this event as accessible as possible. This event is child-inclusive and safer space. We’ll do our best to support travel stipends, accommodations, and other accessibility needs. Please ask if you need support to attend.

We call together this confluence of the bioregionally curious and the bioregionally conscious to meet and explore new and ancient ways of living and being. We hold our visions of a better world with a sense of humility and respect for the unknown. We welcome a diverse array of opinions that move us towards restoration, resistance, and reinhabitation. We look forward to working out contradictions and conflicts in our systems of thought and action. Most of all, we look forward to change-making and relationship building in the coming weeks, months, and years as our bioregional movement grows.

See you on Sunday, April 20th near the Willamette, a little southwest of where the Willamette and Columbia rivers meet in Portland, built atop the village sites of the Multnomah, Kathlamet, Clackamas, Bands of Chinook, Tualatin, Kalapuya, Molalla and many other Tribes who have long gathered along these river banks.

~The Cascadia Branch of Portland, Organizers of Cascadia Rising: A Bioregional Confluence, 2014

FB: https://www.facebook.com/events/1414126682168042/

Contact: info@cascadiaconfluence.org

 

RSVP and simultaneously enter to win raffle prizes.



A History of Bioregionalism

A talk by Judy Goldhaft, 11 AM, room 296/298

palms_planetdrumCurious about bioregionalism? Judy Goldhaft, director of the the Planet Drum Foundation, will be presenting a history of bioregionalism and its effect on the world. Questions examined include:

  • What is bioregionalism?
  • Where did the idea come from and what are the ramifications?
  • What groups were the original movers and shakers of bioregionalism?
  • What kinds of events, publications and community organizing has already occurred or is occurring?
  • What do coalitions look like with groups that don’t use the term but share similar values?
  • What are examples of bioregionalism in action today?

Followed by a Q&A and Discussion

BIO:
Judy Goldhaft co-founded Planet Drum Foundation and is its current director. She was a member of the 60’s radicals known as the San Francisco Diggers, is a performer and helped start the Frisco Bay Mussel Group, a Bioregional Committee of Correspondence in the 1970′s. She has been in the middle of the bioregional movement since it emerged.

Her performance background includes five years with the SF Mime Troupe, founding the Reinhabitory Theater (Northern California bioregional stories) and dancing a featured role in Human Nature. She continues to perform Water Web, a twenty minute rap and eco-performance that celebrates water and describes our complex relationship to it.


Emergency Preparedness, Community Resilience & Sustainability: Same Idea, Different Timescales

A panel featuring Jeremy O’Leary, Charla Chamberlain and Leif Brecke, 11 AM, Room 236

tool-box-iconJeremy O’Leary will be speaking from his experience working with federal, state, and local programs that are meant to help communities prepare for disasters. As a permaculturalist, his methods for disaster preparedness integrate general community resilience and not solely emergency preparedness, or what he calls, “the long emergency”. Charla Chamberlain will speak to her experience having been a community organizer with City Repair in Portland for over a decade. She will discuss the successes and challenges she found in getting neighbors to work together towards common goals. Leif will be discussing how the formation of a Cascadia Resilience Network is taking place the direction he envisions it going.

BIOS: If there is an organization in Portland that has to do with livability and sustainability issues, chances are Jeremy O’Leary is involved with it to some degree. With prior experiences with the city’s Peak Oil Task Force, along with Transition PDX, overseeing TheDirt.org, Portland Permaculture Guild, participating with the City’s Local Energy Assurance Plan (LEAP), and also the FooDiversity group that looks at food and garden issues in East Portland. Jeremy is also an IT staffer for Multnomah County, for which he served on the steering committee for the Multnomah Food Initiative.

Charla Chamberlain grew up in the suburbs of Seattle, Washington as a mixed race woman in a primarily white population in the 1970′s. She was a founding Board member, Co-Director, Intersection Repair Program, T-Horse, Volunteer, and Earth Day Celebration Coordinator with The City Repair Project from 1997-2004. She studied Community Development at Portland State University and is passionate about neighborhoods and cities building collaborative networks of relationship. She is currently the Development Co-Manager, Communications at Sisters Of The Road, a nonprofit cafe building authentic relationships to alleviate the hunger of isolation in Old Town/Chinatown. She enjoys making her own yogurt, kimchi, and shrub, singing in the sunshine of her backyard, and talking to strangers in restaurants.

Leif Brecke is a long time activist and fifth generation Cascadian forest worker. He is a veteran of the bioregion’s forest defense and anti-corporate globalization movements. Leif is the Program Coordinator of the Resilient Communities Project and the Social Systems Facilitator at the Cascadian Resilience Network. A graduate of the University of Oregon with a B.S. in Cultural Anthropology, his research interests are network theory, complex systems, community resilience, and community resistance.


Indigenous Sovereignty and the Rights of Nature in Local Governance

a panel featuring Aurolyn Stwyer, Treothe Bullock, Paul Cienfuegos and Lucy Marie

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis panel seeks to explore the positive and problematic intersections between Indigenous Sovereignty strategies and rights-based organizing in Cascadia, with the purpose of elaborating an appropriate practice of decolonization within a settler colonial context.

As the power of multinational corporations continues to grow and international trade agreements preempt environmental protection laws, can grassroots movements effectively confront the logic and power of colonial law by implementing proactive decolonial assertions of sovereignty from below? Can a bioregional vision be employed to reinterpret the mainstream narrative of the relationship between the State, corporate power, and civil society while dismantling settler colonialism?

Can complementary strategies be developed between these two movements, which both seek to contravene the State-centric sovereignty of “law-from-above” with grassroots assertions of “law-from-below?” What potential risks of re-colonization may exist in Community Rights strategies within a settler colonial context, and how can these risks be recognized, transformed, and deliberately rooted within and through Indigenous vision and struggle?

This dialogue will bring together voices from the Confederated Tribes of Warm Spring, the People’s Water Trust, Friends of Celilo Falls, and Community Rights PDX.
 
BIOS:
Aurolyn Stwyer is a member of the Warm Springs and Wasco tribes. She is a traditional food gatherer for the longhouse. She has an MBA with the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in human and organizational systems with the Fielding Graduate University, her Ph.D studies has a focus on the Plateau heritage rites of passage ceremonies. Her board memberships include the Museum at Warm Springs, Friends of Celilo, and ONABEN. Aurolyn is the owner of Red Skye Trading Post and Pawn Store at Warm Springs, Oregon.
 
Treothe Bullock is an experienced glaciologist and ecologist who currently works as a science educator, writer and photographer. His blog, Tree Oathe, features writing and photography from a Bioregional Cascadian perspective. He sits on the boards of Friends of Celilo Falls and The Celilo Falls Restoration Fund – working toward restoration of Cascadia’s historic ecological/spiritual/cultural center – Celilo Falls.
 
Paul Cienfuegos is a regional leader in the Community Rights movement, which works to dismantle corporate constitutional so-called “rights” and assert the people’s inherent right to self-government. He has been leading workshops, giving public talks, and organizing local communities since 1995 when he founded Democracy Unlimited in northern California. Since 2011, he has lived in Portland, Oregon, where he co-founded CommunityRightsPDX.org, and is helping to establish the Oregon Community Rights Network which launched in 2013. His talks have been broadcast nationally on ‘Alternative Radio’.
More info can be found at PaulCienfuegos.com
 
Marie is a 4th Generation Portlander. She graduated from the University of Oregon with a degree in Environmental Studies, earned her Permaculture Design Certificate from Three Sisters Permaculture and the Phipps Conservatory in Pittsburgh, PA, She returned to Portland in 2012 to attend the Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College, where she is now in her last year.
Marie is a co-author of The People’s Water Trust municipal ballot initiative, a first-of-its-kind policy innovation designed to keep our city’s water clean, affordable, accessible, and managed solely in the public’s interest. If enacted (when enacted), the Trust may well become a model of responsible conservation for the entire nation.


Functional Wildness: Sociocracy as an Approach to Bioregional Governance

Workshop by Marc Tobin and Melanie Rios

641px-Triple-Spiral-Symbol-filled
Sociocracy, also known as Dynamic Governance, is a method of organizational design and decision making that is both inclusive and efficient. It could be applied to bioregional governance in a way that is far more participatory and inclusive at the grassroots level than the way that representative democracy is currently practiced in our society. At the same time, it has many advantages over the way that consensus process is typically used. Typical forms of consensus are hard to scale in large groups, as they often rely on whole group meetings. Sociocracy uses interlinked small groups, that can act efficiently, while sharing key information and power with other groups that they affect.

Marc and Melanie have both been in the “trenches’, applying sociocracy to ecovillages and community groups and have both trained in sociocracy with it’s main U.S. teacher, John Buck. We will be giving a basic
overview of sociocracy, sharing from our personal experiences with the model, and lead dynamic small group discussions of how sociocracy could be applied to bioregional governance.

BIOS: Melanie Rios helps communities thrive socially and organizationally. She has lived in intentional communities for forty years. She has taught permaculture courses at Lost Valley Education Center outside of Eugene, Oregon for the past ten years, and served as their Executive Director until two years ago as they adopted sociocracy for their governance system. She is mid-way through an eight-month immersion process with Columbia Ecovillage in Portland cultivating cultural transformation and effective governance.

Marc Tobin offers a holistic range of services to community groups and organizations that include group facilitation, conflict resolution and mediation, ecological design, sustainable urban planning, and organizational development. He founded and taught innovative courses in Ecovillage and Permaculture Design at Lost Valley Education Center, an ecovillage where he lived for 8 years, putting sustainable community philosophy into practice. Marc holds degrees of Master of Community and Regional Planning and a BA of Environmental Studies. He is also an active musician. rising-vision.net


Biocentric Resistance as Catalyst for Bioregional Resistance

A workshop led by Karen Coulter

mountainAs the global climate crisis and the spreading radiation from the Fukishima nuclear reactor melt-down demonstrate, the destruction that humans cause to the environment now transcends national boundaries and cannot be repaired with technological solutions or societal value systems that continue to prioritize human desires above ecological limits. For bioregionalism to work in creating a viable future, it is necessary to have a biocentric value system, in which the well-being and flourishing of non-human life has value in itself, independent of the usefulness of the non-human world for human purposes. The richness and diversity of life forms are valuable in themselves.

The philosophy of Deep Ecology posits that humans have no right to reduce the richness and diversity of ecosystems except to satisfy vital human needs. Present human interference with the non-human world is excessive and is rapidly worsening. Policies that need to be changed affect basic economic, technological, and ideological structures. Deep ecologists believe that those who subscribe to these ideas have an obligation to try to implement the necessary changes.

This workshop on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology explains these concepts, explores what changes would need to be made, and examines activist struggles and movements within Cascadia that have pursued these goals.

BIO: Karen Coulter has been part of the Earth First! movement since 1984 and an activist since 1980. She is a naturalist who has spent the last 23 years as co-founder and director of Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project getting to know the forest ecosystems and wildlife of eastern Oregon. She has spent most of every summer in the forests field-surveying thousands of acres of proposed timber sales to protect biodiversity and ecological integrity. She has also been a principal activist with the Program on Corporations, Law, and Democracy; a Board member of the Fund for Wild Nature; and a campaigner for Greenpeace International. She currently volunteers with Portland Rising Tide and works with Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project. She has given workshops on Biocentrism and Deep Ecology at an Earth First! Organizers Conference in Florida and at an Earth First! regional rendezvous in Oregon.


Calling Ourselves Home: Feeling the Path of Right Relationship

A workshop led by Rain Crowe

callinourselveshomeFeeling for the Path of Right Relationship

To those of us of Indo-European descent, living here on unceded indigenous lands, I offer this inquiry and framing, that we might together find a courage to face, what we must, for the sake of the imperiled web of life.

What is “whiteness” and how do we accountably reckon with the privileges of settler colonialism as we endeavor to cultivate a sacred relationship to lands that are not our biological and cultural forebears’?

How do we recognize the patterns of conquest, slavery, entitlement, and estrangement in our lives and work to intervene in replicating them?

What are the relationships between grief, shame, vulnerability, and action, in the context of decolonizing ourselves?

How do we continue to simultaneously compost the culture of Empire and regenerate non-appropriated Earth cultures?

What are some approaches to collectively healing inter-generational trauma and cross-cultural trauma?

Note: in this forum, we’ll endeavor upon a meandering process of a journey, not a high speed arrival at a predetermined destination. I’ll be presenting some of my own explorations and beliefs (not answers) about these questions, and we’ll have space for arising reflections and inquiries amongst the group. This time is meant to demonstrate a template for discussion and to inspire the participants to carry on with these questions and more outside of this forum. We are working with a finite amount of time, and to the best of my ability I’ll ensure that we have a healthy closure to our time together.

BIO: rain crowe is the founder of Calling Ourselves Home, a body of work dedicated to cultivating the arts of interdependent relationships through group facilitation, mediation, and educational opportunities. She is a regenerative culture events organizer who works with spiritual, political, rewilding, and intentional communities all over the country. She teaches and writes about magic and ritual, the ancestral skills of council making and restorative conflict transformation, systems thinking in radical organizing, and ecstatic connection to the sacred. callingourselveshome.weebly.com


Appropriate Appropriation and Ancestral Technology

A Panel with Peter Bauer and Eric Bernardo

glassknapping2-300x200There is growing interest in using ancestral technology as a mechanism for living more sustainably, connecting with ancestral heritage, and providing for yourself with things from nature, or the simple enjoyment of crafting with your hands. While all humans have used various forms of these technologies, there is often friction between Native Americans and non-natives in the United States. This friction stems from the misappropriation of these technologies by non-natives, the privileged position non-native people have of being able to do these things at all (i.e. financial access to schools and gatherings), and a general lack of knowledge of traditional “prehistoric” European traditions among both Native Americans and non-natives. There will never be one right way to practice ancestral technology in a way that appeases everyone’s sensibilities. However, we must spark this discussion on a larger scale to increase the number of people working together and to reach a deeper understanding between different cultures in order to have mutual respect. This panel discussion is a step in that direction.

Questions to be discussed:

  • Where is the line between reclaiming your own ancestral heritage and culturally appropriating from Natives?
  • Is there a way to appropriately appropriate? What technologies have been shared by all human cultures?
  • How does entitlement fit into this discussion?
  • How does privilege fit into this discussion?
  • How do we go about creating alliances and allies between Native Americans and non-natives in using ancestral technologies?

BIOS: Eric Bernardo is a member of the Watlala Band of Chinuk of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. He received my Masters Degree in Education in 2009 from the University of Oregon and a Bachelors of Arts: History from PSU back in 2008. Go Blazers! He is currently teaching his tribe’s indigenous language at their office in Portland and at a community centre in Eugene.

Peter Bauer (formerly writing under the moniker “Urban Scout”) is a multi-disciplinary artist and environmental educator. During his time as urban scout he received local press in the The Oregonian, Portland Mercury, Willamette Week, national press in ReadyMade Magazine and international press in Positive Living Magazine (UK) and Chain Reaction (AU) for his efforts to create and promote the culture of rewilding. He loves basketry, playing the banjo, and is a fluent speaker of Chinuk Wawa (Chinook Jargon), the Native trade language of the Pacific Northwest. During the summer of 2012 he attended Lynx Vilden’s Stone Age immersion program. Bauer has been an environmental educator for over a decade, working with local organizations like Cascadia Wild, Friends of Tryon Creek, Audubon Society, Portland Waldorf, Shining Star Waldorf, Cleveland High School, and is the executive director at Rewild Portland, a non-profit that he founded. Aside from running Rewild Portland, he currently works at Shining Star Waldorf School in Portland as an instructor for their Nature Immersion Program.



***THIS PANEL HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO ILLNESS***

Separating from White Separatists: Keeping the Cascadian Movement Free of White Nationalism and Racism

Presented by Rose City Antifa

RCA will be presenting on the history of structural and insurgent racism in the Pacific Northwest and how that impacts organizing with a Cascadian, bioregionalist politic. Specifically, we would discuss the Northwest Imperative and the historical progression of the White Nationalist movement in the region. We will give an overview of groups currently working to create a white homeland here in the Pacific Northwest, such as Northwest Front. Modern White Nationalists have a sophisticated message and are adept at soft-peddling their racism. They have adopted leftist, environmentalist trappings. It is therefore important that organizers become aware of these groups and what their messaging looks like, so they are able to eject White Nationalists from their spaces. We would like to unpack the hard right’s ideology and highlight “dog whistle” terminology that Cascadian organizers should be on the look out for. For example we can show a sample of white nationalist writing, along with a sample of left writing and ask the crowd to distinguish between the two to demonstrate how similar they can sound. It is crucial that Cascadian organizers address issues of race in their work, both because of vulnerability to right infiltration and because our region has a long history of institutional racism. We would like to give organizers a background on the deep and pervasive racism in this area, so that they are more aware of how their messaging is received by communities of color and so they can act more consciously in a climate of overwhelming whiteness. To this end we would like to give organizers some information and concrete tools to more actively and effectively challenge white supremacy in their work.

Bio: Rose City Antifa is an antifascist organization that has been active in Portland since 2007. We oppose fascist organizing in physical, cultural, and political spaces through direct action, education, and solidarity.
We aim to confront and disrupt any level of fascist organization to the greatest extent of our capabilities; to organize independently of the state, and against it wherever necessary; and to be part of a wider anti-authoritarian, working-class movement that provides anti-racist, anti-capitalist, pro-queer, and feminist answers to the social problems which far-right organizations exploit.
***THIS PANEL HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO ILLNESS***


Climate Chaos and Cascadia: Place-Based Resistance to Global Catastrophe

A Panel featuring Scott Schroder + Friends

clearcutkidsAnthropogenic climate change and the resulting mass extinction, drought, fire, flooding, and skewed weather patterns threaten the Cascadian bioregion, and any of our plans for rehabilitation, restoration, or reinhabitation, more profoundly than any other single industrial act of eco-assualt. Yet because climate change is not an immediately tangible act of destruction restricted to a single place and time, because we can’t see or hear climate change in the same way we can see and hear a dam or clearcut; a visceral sense of the threat of climate change is elusive. This panel breaks from abstract discussion of atmospheric greenhouse gases, and roots the issue in palpable and living things: wolverines, salmon, forests and in rapidly approaching catastrophic effects on the bioregion we call home. We will discuss the effects climate change has already had on the region–increased temperature, rising seas, more precipitation, diminished snowpack–and the landscapes and species that are threatened with extinction or severe alteration by the fossil fuel economy. We will discuss strategies and possibilities for human adaptedness and survival in the face of fundamental ecological changes. We will argue that effective resistance requires reconceiving a nebulous and global catastrophe as an eminent threat to this place and to any living thing who calls Cascadia home.

BIO:Beginning in the late 1990s, Scott Schroder participated in campaigns against industrial logging throughout the western United States with various Earth First! groups, as well as organizing large-scale resistance to clearcutting in the Sierra Nevada with Yuba Nation. Simultaneously, he succeeded in stopping numerous National Forest timber sales with administrative appeals. In 2008, he was a founding member of the Doom School art collective in Portland and later curated music and performances at the Hall of the Woods outside of Olympia, Washington. More recently, he has organized direct action against fossil fuels in California and Oregon and written on the climate policies of both states. He creates a blog and zine, Spring Speaks Truth, and is on probation for blockading tar sands equipment en route through Oregon to Alberta, Canada.


Note: The Presenters at Cascadia Rising: A Bioregional Confluence are bringing
their own views and/or the views of the organizations they represent but
not necessarily the views of the Cascadia Branch of Portland or conference organizers.